BRT vehicle length

Amsterdam 18m     (2011)  
Bangkok 12m     (2017)  
Beijing 18.5m     (2015)  
Bogota 18m, 24.5    also 8-12m feeder buses (2016)  
Brisbane 12m    some new 18m buses and recently 500 14.5m buses (2015)  
Cali 12m, 18m     (2013)  
Cape Town 12m, 18m     (2012)  
Changzhou 18.5m    11m supplementary route buses (2015)  
Chengdu 18m     (2015)  
Dar es Salaam 12m, 18m     (2017)  
Guangzhou 12m, 18m     (2017)  
Guiyang 12m, 18m     (2017)  
Hangzhou 18.5m    Also 11m buses (2017)  
Islamabad 18m     (2015)  
Istanbul 19.5m, 26.4m    50 26.4m, 250 19.5m (2012)  
Jakarta 12m, 18m    196 articulated 18m buses (2013)  
Jinan 12m, 18.5m     (2014)  
Johannesburg 12m, 18m     (2012)  
Kuala Lumpur 12m     (2015)  
Lanzhou 12m, 18m     (2015)  
Leon 18.15m    plus some 10m supplementary buses (2013)  
Lianyungang 12m, 18m     (2017)  
Lima 18m    plus 12m feeder buses (2011)  
Los Angeles 18m, 20m     (2013)  
Mexico City 12m, 18m, 25m    mostly 18m. Some 25 buses in line 1; 12m buses in line 4 (2013)  
Nagoya 12m     (2013)  
Nantes 18m     (2011)  
Paris 18m     (2016)  
Pune 12m     (2015)  
Quito ~17m     (2008)  
Shanghai 12m, 18m     (2017)  
Shaoxing 14m     (2017)  
Urumqi 12m, 18m     (2016)  
Xiamen 10m, 12m, 18m    12m trunk, 10m feeder. 6 18m BRT buses introduced 24 April 2010. 6 more on 1 May (2016)  
Yancheng 12m, 18m     (2015)  
Yichang 12m, 18m    170 12m, 30 18m (2015)  
Yinchuan 12m, 18m     (2015)  
Zhengzhou 12m, 18m, 13.7m    plus 11m supplementary route buses (2016)  
Zhongshan 9m, 12m, 18m     (2015)  

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